Rich Bulls Club team resurfaces after being called out for rug pulling $3.7 million

An illustration of a brown bull, with a pile of poo on its head, on a toilet-paper-esque background. The text "BANNED!" is stamped above it."Banned" Rich Bull NFT (attribution)
Crypto sleuth zachxbt researched the Rich Bulls Club, an NFT project that launched in December with NFTs priced at 0.3 ETH (~$1,350) a pop. The project included a clause where "selling under our minimum selling price agreement is forbidden"—anyone who sold a Rich Bulls NFT for less than 3 ETH ($13,500) would find the NFT image modified to a bull with a poo emoji on its head, with the text "BANNED!" stamped across it in red. The project roadmap promised networking and business opportunities enabled by its community members, exclusive events, opportunities to win supercars or hundreds of thousands of dollars, and a "real-life Squid Game event" where one person would win $1 million. Needless to say, none of this transpired, and the project quietly deleted its website and Instagram accounts as the founder cashed out over $3 million.

Two hours after zachxbt published his research, the team made their first post in three months, with multiple excuses for the issues zachxbt highlighted.

NFT influencer 0x_fxnction suffers $240,000 wallet compromise

NFT influencer 0x_fxnction reported that his wallet had been compromised, and 2349 SOL (~$240,000) had been stolen. The money had primarily been profit from the DeGods project, he said, and was unwisely stored in one hot wallet because it was "meant to help buy a house and was being withdrawn in the next weeks".

He said he hadn't used the wallet to mint any NFTs since October, and said he had revoked all access to minting websites since then. He wrote that he was unsure how the compromise had happened: "My best guess: an old minting site from October still had access to my wallet, even after 'revoking' happened in Phantom.... But honestly, it's just a guess."

Developers drain over $1.1 million from $CHEDDA

The price of the $CHEDDA token suddenly plummeted 50% when a developer removed $1.17 million from the project. The withdrawal was accomplished with a function only available to privileged wallets—that is, those belonging to the project team or its developers.

Members of the Chedda team claimed on Discord that they were not behind it, and that it had been done by an outsourced development team who was working on the projects farming and staking. "They technically should've been within contract, but they robbed us," wrote Discord moderator Ali Michelle (referring to legal contracts rather than smart contracts). "They were in contract so it would be illegal and full on theft, i believe". Despite the devastating loss, Michelle urged remaining members of the community to "hodl and help us bring this back to life!"

The project had been audited by CertiK, who were quick to note that the contract containing the function used to drain funds was "not in CertiK’s audit scope".

Atari cuts ties with their "Atari Token" partner

A press release from Atari announced that the company would be cutting ties with ICICB Group. In addition to Atari granting ICICB hotel and casino licenses, the original deal had also resulted in the creation of the "Atari Chain" and "Atari Token" ($ATRI).

Atari Token was described as "decentralized cryptocurrency that was created to become the token of reference for the interactive entertainment industry". It launched in November 2020, tanking in price immediately on release. Despite a brief boom around March 2021, the token has mostly traded below its launch price.

In the press release, Atari wrote, "Atari disclaims any interest in the [...] Joint Venture, currently promoted as Atari Tokens, and related websites, whitepapers and social media channels are unlicensed, unsanctioned and are outside the control of Atari." They also wrote that they would be replacing existing $ATRI tokens with new tokens in the future. Atari wrote that the termination of the hotel and casino agreements resulted in an €11 million ($11.8 million) write-off, but that financial impact of the token changes wouldn't be disclosed until the FY22 report.

$650,000 phishing attack against MetaMask user reveals that credentials are automatically backed up to iCloud

An ape with fur resembling magma and volcanic rock, with a green muzzle, with leeches coming out of its nose and mouthMutant Ape #28478 (attribution)
Some MetaMask users using iOS were shocked to discover that their MetaMask credentials were automatically being stored to iCloud today, after MetaMask acknowledged this was the case in the wake of a costly phishing attack. Domenic Iacovone lost cryptocurrency and several pricey NFTs after a successful social engineering attack by scammers pretending to be Apple support earned them access to his iCloud account. From there, they were able to access his iCloud data, and use the stored MetaMask credentials to drain his wallet. The trader lost $650,000 worth of cryptocurrency and NFTs, including Mutant Apes and Gutter Cats, to the attack.

It's not yet clear if others have been affected by the same type of attack, but MetaMask tweeted instructions for iCloud users on how to turn off the automatic backups. Most people seemed to have previously been unaware that this data was being backed up in iCloud. MetaMask turned off replies on their tweet announcement, apparently anticipating the outrage from their users. Iacovone was among the outraged, writing, "Keep exposing MetaMask until they do what is right and take care of this issue and the people affected by it".

Palisade discloses infectious XSS vulnerability on Rarible that could have arbitrarily changed NFT listing data and transactions

Security researchers at Palisade publicly disclosed a wormable cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability and WAF bypass they had discovered and responsibly disclosed to Rarible several days earlier.

The researchers were able to inject malicious code into the profile photo on Rarible, which only required a person to visit the malicious profile in order to run. This code could have then "infected" other signed-in users' profile photos, increasing the spread of the vulnerability to anyone who then visited their profiles. Once infected, the code would persist across all pages on Rarible, and could change arbitrary data on NFT listings, modify smart contract interactions, leak or modify profile information, or prompt users to sign arbitrary messages.

In an example, the researchers showed how a listing of a Bored Ape (pricey NFTs which currently have a floor price ~100 ETH / $290,000) could be modified for an impacted user to appear as though it was listed for only 1 ETH (~$2,900). A user who attempted to buy the apparently massively-discounted NFT could then be prompted to approve a sale transaction which would actually run a setApprovalForAll call that would allow the attackers to steal crypto and NFTs from the user's wallet.

This bug was the second Rarible vulnerability that was publicly disclosed this week, following a vulnerability with SVG NFTs disclosed by Check Point Research on April 14.

After the security researchers responsibly disclosed the vulnerability, which could have quickly wreaked havoc across Rarible's entire userbase, Rarible patched the issue and awarded them a bug bounty of $5,000. Good luck to Rarible if the next people who find a bug are even slightly more motivated by money than they are by ethics.

Crypto multimillionaire and former defi developer Andre Cronje calls for crypto regulation as he founds an investment banking company

Portrait of Andre Cronje, a man with a short beard, wearing a suitAndre Cronje (attribution)
Andre Cronje has graced the pages of W3IGG before, when he and his development partner Anton Nell unexpectedly announced they would be abandoning their 20+ defi projects, without giving any specific reason.

The reasoning may have just become clear, as Cronje published a blog post titled "The rise and fall of crypto culture" in which he wrote, "Crypto culture has strangled crypto ethos... I now more than ever see the need, or even necessity for regulation, not as a mechanism to prevent, but as a mechanism to protect. Its like a child trying to stick their finger into a electric outlet, you stop them, before they can learn why they shouldn't. One day they will understand, but not today." He remained optimistic about the prospects of crypto if regulation is introduced: "We will see the rise of a new blockchain economy, not one driven by greed, but instead driven by trust, not trustlessness."

Not everyone was impressed by his apparent change in tune. Twitter user 0xCana wrote, "andre cronje with the gigagrift walking away with over 1 billion dollars generated from crypto and then exits the space, rails against 'get rich quick mentalities' and advocates for strict regulations and then founds an investment banking company. incredible."

2omb and Redemption defi projects endure repeated flash loan attacks

Redemption provides the liquidity pools for 2omb, a Fantom-based algorithmic stablecoin project with big promises: "What if you could invest in a golden goose? Something you can acquire that will actually print you more money to either invest or use?"

Starting on April 18, the projects were targeted with a series of flash loan attacks. The project faced a total of 267 flash loan attacks within one day, leading to major volatility in the ostensibly stable coin. In an impressive display of optimism, a project team member wrote, "This has caused a large price pump. (Also benefited with 3% more burned tokens in fees.) The outcome and intent of the person who has done this, is unknown and it may work in our favour, Do not panic, and do not buy or sell until stable." The attacker made a profit of around $190,000 from the attacks.

Beanstalk Farms stablecoin project loses $182 million to exploit

All my magic beans gone. An attacker successfully used a flash loan attack to exploit a flaw in Beanstalk Farms' stablecoin protocol, which allowed them to make off with 24,830 ETH (almost $76 million). The attacker then donated $250,000 to Ukraine before moving the remaining funds to Tornado Cash to tumble.

Estimated damages to the project were higher than the amount the hacker was able to take for themselves—around $182 million. The $BEAN token, once pegged to $1, dropped to nearly 0. The project creator wrote in the Discord, "We are fucked. This project has not had any venture backing, so it is highly unlikely there is any sort of bail out coming." However, they were later slightly more optimistic, writing, "it may also be the start of something good... there may be a path forward. We don't want to comment on next steps until that path is at least visible to us" while reiterating that a bail-out was "highly unlikely". They also told members of their community that they had contacted the FBI about the theft.

Someone successfully games raffle for popular NFT allowlist with Sybil attack

Pixel art of a white owl with one squinting eye, wearing a forest ranger hat, on a light green backgroundMoonbirds #768 (attribution)
The NFT project "Moonbirds" generated so much hype that they implemented a raffle system for the many people who hoped to get on the project's allowlist, hoping to make it more fair. However, because it is relatively trivial for a person to create many crypto wallets, a person was able to game the system by creating over 400 wallets, which went on to win more than 50 slots on the project allowlist. This strategy—creating many accounts or wallets to gain an advantage—is known as a "Sybil attack".

This did not go over so well for the people who were eager to get a spot in line to mint NFTs that cost 2.5 ETH ($7,650), but was selling with a floor price of 13.1 ETH ($40,000) on the secondary market shortly after the mint completed. If the person behind the Sybil scheme flipped their NFTs for the current floor price, they could make upwards of $1.6 million in profit.

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